Tyndall National Institute opens wireless communications laboratory in Dublin

Dr Lester Ho, Dr Holger Claussen and Dr Senad Bulja, Tyndall National Institute
Dr Lester Ho, Dr Holger Claussen and Dr Senad Bulja, Tyndall National Institute

Fifty jobs to be created in IoT, Wi-Fi, 6G, AI, and quantum systems research

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3 February 2021 | 0

Tyndall National Institute has opened its first research facility outside of Cork in Dublin. The Wireless Communications Research Laboratory will see the creation of 50 research jobs by 2025.

The Dublin lab will host a new wireless communications projects in IoT communications, Wi-Fi, 5G, 6G and beyond.

The Laboratory will be headed up by industry thought leader Dr Holger Claussen, along with Dr Lester Ho and Dr Senad Bulja. All three are former researchers with Nokia Bell Labs Ireland, where they created the foundations for many of Nokia’s next generation products and pioneered Small Cell Networks, now a $6.7bn/a market.

 

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The team will initially be based at Connect, the Science Foundation Ireland research centre for future networks, hosted at Trinity College Dublin.

“Building on such high calibre international talent will ensure that Ireland becomes a leader in the future of communications innovation,” said CEO of Tyndall National Institute Prof William Scanlon. “Dr Claussen and his team will be instrumental in developing ground-breaking wireless technologies and will allow Ireland to take the lead in solving the fundamental problems in wireless communications across many domains such as Industry 4.0 machine communications, virtual and augmented reality, and mobile broadband. This new location and team will help us realise our Tyndall 2025 strategy for research excellence and ambitious growth.”

Dr Claussen added: “My team and I are excited to continue with our innovative work in shaping the future of wireless networks to enable exponential growth in mobile data traffic and reliable low latency communications on behalf of Tyndall and Ireland.”

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